Courses

To view each program's curriculum, full course catalog, as well as General Education (GE) courses and minors offered through the school, click the links below. The table below includes a list of electives that will be offered by each section and a list of GE and introductory courses offered through the school for the spring 2019 semester. To see the full list of courses and their details for a particular term, visit the schedule of classes on BuckeyeLink

PROGRAM CURRICULA

Architecture

Graduate | Undergraduate | Undergraduate Minor in Architecture | Section Course Catalog

Landscape Architecture

Graduate | Undergraduate | Undergraduate Minor in Landscape Architecture | Section Course Catalog

City and Regional Planning

Doctorate | Master's | Undergraduate | Minors in City and Regional Planning | Section Course Catalog

City and Regional Planning Electives

Spring 2019

CRPLAN 2210/E Sustainable Urbanism (3)

Jesus Lara

Globalization is changing cities, economies, social networks, and the environment. Technological innovation, entrepreneurship, and policy making guides the future of sustainable cities.

CRPLAN 2630 Planning for Future Cities (3)

Kimberly Burton

Cities are constantly evolving over time as new forms of technology, governance, and other factors occur. Students will explore Utopian concepts, learn how to help cities develop in a positive way, be familiar with current and emerging technology trends that affect cities, and gain inspiration from the many variations of futuristic cities envisioned in the science fiction genre.

CRPLAN 3500 The Socially Just City (3)

Lauren Edwards

Too many cities are split between the haves and the have-nots. Explore how to reduce poverty, increase access to public services, and create a high quality of life for all residents.

GE soc sci orgs and polities and diversity soc div in the US course.

CRPLAN 3600 Land Development Planning (3)

Jonathan Ezell

Planners shape cities. The land development process requires understanding the impacts of new development and redevelopment in order to reimagine more vibrant sites.

CRPLAN 4110 Transportation and Land Use Planning (3)

Amber Woodburn

Communities integrate transportation while promoting economic development and land-use policies to manage growth.  Improve the efficiency of travel and contain infrastructure costs.

Prereq: 2110 (110), 2110H, 2000, or 310.

CRPLAN 4597 The Global Environment in Planning (3)

Don Leonard

A review of challenges in developed and developing countries, examining planning issues associated with economic development, social equity, growth and rural development.

GE cross-disciplinary seminar course.

CRPLAN 4900S Plan Making (6)

Jonathan Ezell

OHIO OPIOID CRISIS COMMUNITY PLANNING FRAMEWORK

Currently, American Planning Association’s (APA) research team is tracking initiatives from communities around the country including mapping opioid hot spots to better understand where to employ limited resources (including OSU CURA) but have ideas for how to use these maps in a planning process. The APA is also aware of municipalities that are assessing their zoning laws which usually prohibit (or make it difficult) to open non-residential opioid treatment centers which are critical for recovery. It is also aware of trauma-informed approaches to planning and community development that can help curb the effects of the opioid crisis. OSU CRP is home to American Planning Association’s Planning for Underserved Populations Interest Group which includes members from around the U.S. who are working toward curbing the opioid crisis in the communities they serve. 

In this studio, you will work with Sagar Shah, PhD, Manager of the American Planning Association’s Planning and Community Health Center to create an initial framework for Ohio communities that are affected by Ohio’s opioid crisis using effective community planning tools. The American Planning Association (APA) is the leading national organization for urban planning. APA’s mission is to provide leadership in the development of vital communities by advocating excellence in planning, promoting education and citizen empowerment, and providing planners with the tools and resources necessary to meet the challenges of growth and change. Your ideas for how a targeted community planning process for the opioid crisis can help implement widespread positive change is the goal. Your work may be featured by the Planning and Community Health Center online, in print, in conferences, and, perhaps, in future planning policy. You will also feed knowledge to the Planning for Underserved Populations Interest Group of which Professor Ezell is the administrator. Students who choose this studio will be required to take two Institutional Research Board exams and sign a Conflict of Interest Agreement. Those who wish to start early, please contact the professor at ezell.5@osu.edu.

CRPLAN 4900S Plan Making (6)

Kimberly Burton, Santina Contreras

For the International Development Studio in Spring Semester 2019, students will be working on various projects in Latin America/Caribbean, focusing on the country of Belize and potentially the territory of the U.S. Virgin Islands.  Projects will range across many areas of planning, including sustainability, resiliency, public engagement, environment, and community development.

Cross-listed with CRPLAN 6970.

CRPLAN 4900S Plan Making (6)

Bernadette Hanlon

The Neighborhood Planning Studio for Spring 2019 is focused on a community planning process for the Hilltop community in Columbus, OH. The studio is in collaboration with the Neighborhood Design Center, who is directing a neighborhood plan for the Hilltop community. The planning process for the neighborhood is to inform future public, private and nonprofit activities and to empower community residents in shaping the future of the community. The studio will focus on continuing specific planning activities for the community from the Fall 2018 semester. The community planning approach for this studio is an asset based model of community development, this model will be specifically tied to the planning activities for the course.

CRPLAN 4900S Plan Making (6)

Roxyanne Burrus

Age-Friendly Columbus and Franklin County are part of the international World Health Organization and AARP network of age-friendly cities initiative. In 2016, under the leadership of MORPC, Age-Friendly Columbus identified challenges and concerns within our built, social, and supportive services environments through an intense inclusive-research process. In 2017, a Strategic Plan was written to outline a 3-year improvement implementation period. In early 2018, The Franklin County Commissioners signed on to expand the Columbus efforts to all areas within the County.

Working with a cadre of older adults as our champions, we are preparing to dovetail Age-Friendly Columbus and Franklin County. This will occur through a county-wide best practices exchange, followed by outreach in each local city or village within Franklin County. In order to ensure equitable and accessible strategies that reflect the needs and preferences of our communities, we must again follow a rigorous inclusive-planning process.

The Spring 2019 studio will provide assistance in moving this project forward by pairing students with Franklin County communities with the following objectives. 1. Run inclusive-planning focus groups, 2. Analyze additional data and best practices, and 3. Provide a report for each community. This will be a unique experience with a marginalized population; there will be involvement by key players in the field to speak and work with students, coordination of the outreach in each community, printing, and translation services. Additionally, with the program now being led by The OSU College of Social Work, an interdisciplinary approach and education will be offered for students. 

CRPLAN 5160 Green Building Methods for Planning (1)

Kimberly Burton

This course focuses on green building methods, techniques and practices and how they can be applied to city planning practice. Particular attention is paid to LEED-certification, a program that recognizes building practices that save money, reduce water consumption, make better material choices, have higher property values, and overall have fewer negative impacts on the environment.

CRPLAN 5300 Airport Planning, Design and Development (3)

Amber Woodburn, Seth Young

A comprehensive study of airport planning, design and development, the role of the airport and its components as part of the overall air transportation system, the issues related to the planning, design, and development of the airport and its system.

Prereq: Aviatn 3000. Cross-listed in Aviatn and CivilEn.

CRPLAN 5400 Planning for Housing (3)

Bernadette Hanlon

Housing - including its uses, meaning, design, and role. The creation of a range of housing to support growth and revitalization of cities and regions.

Cross-listed in PubAfrs.

CRPLAN 5670 Creative Place Marketing (1) [session 2]

Elizabeth Pandora

This course introduces the idea of creative placemaking and creative place marketing, explores issues in place marketing and introduces students to key considerations for developing place marketing plans, cultural tourism strategies, and other initiatives that improve the quality and economics of place through arts and culture. Emotional aspects of place and social justice issues are also covered.

CRPLAN 5798 Planning Study Abroad: Moving (And Eating) Around Taiwan: A Bus, Subway and High Speed Rail Systems Planning Workshop (3)

Jonathan Ezell

Rapid globalization of cities creates new opportunities to explore, investigate and analyze urban development internationally. READ MORE

CRPLAN 5880 Interdepartmental Seminar: Food as the Foundation for Sustainable Settlements (3)

Kareem Usher

The topics of Urban Food Security and Food Justice are now well established in planning discourse. With this perspective, the course incorporates case studies and experiences from around the world to extend our view beyond the local and ethnocentric trappings.  In doing so, the course is inviting to students in International Affairs as well as Policy, Political Science and City and Regional Planning.

We begin with an understanding of the globalised food system and parse out major developments that have led us to the present.  Although some extol the benefits of this approach to food production and distribution, empirically we find the effects are deleterious to both the natural environment and societies around the world.  In the United States and other Western countries, the globalised food system has meant that many communities go under-served due to a lack of access to affordable, culturally appropriate and adequate food.  Simultaneously, they display an excess of less-wholesome food options.  The consequences have been damaging effects on community health, quality of life and the natural environment.  Elements of socio-economic class and ethnicity are considered in the broader concept of local food systems as a social justice issue.

Food systems planning exists at the nexus of and is complimentary to other more established planning topics such as land-use planning, community and neighbourhood planning, economic development planning and equity, social justice and collaborative governance, among others.  Students will be asked to think broadly and harness ideas and concepts from among planning main-stays in order to fully appreciate the course.

Course meetings will follow a seminar format where students will be responsible to facilitate class meetings which includes developing learning activities and leading class discussions.

CRPLAN 5890 Workshop in City and Regional Planning: Regional Economic Development (3)

Yasuyuki Motoyama

This course will introduce students to both theories and policies of regional economic development. We will cover commonly-used practices including industry recruitment, cluster development, small business development, university-anchored innovation, and workforce development. We will also go through a series of case regional studies to understand locally-specific assets and conditions that shape and hinder strategies and policies.

CRPLAN 5960 Design Competition: ULI Hines Competition (2) [session 1]

Matthew Leasure

The purpose of this course is to create an urban design concept for the ULI Hines Competition.  This national graduate-level competition consists of an intensive two-week process to research, design, and determine the economic feasibility of an urban development plan.  Five finalists are selected nationally to participate in the final competition round and the winning team receives a $50,000 cash prize.  Students will be assigned professional mentors from the design, development, and financial sectors and will participate in numerous one-on-one and group learning sessions with these mentors.

CRPLAN 5997  Planning in the Developing World (3)

Don Leonard

What changes when we take our plans to the developing world? This course will lead you from Brazil to Nigeria to India to find out - with lots of stops in between. It combines historical and global perspectives on international development theory with real-world case studies that will force you to consider difficult tradeoffs and make tough choices.

CRPLAN 6080 Advanced GIS for Professional Planning Practice (4)

Zhenhua Chen

The course examines the major techniques of advanced GIS in city and regional planning, with emphasis on spatial modeling and quantitative analysis. The course begins with a brief review of GIS and the fundamentals of spatial analysis, and then moves on to the major GIS analytical techniques used in planning related research and practice. The course covers ten topics, including network analysis, roads and highways, community analysts, business analysts, geoplanner, spatial econometrics, visualization for urban planning analysis, land use modeling, 3D modeling, and image classification. The course stresses spatial GIS applications in city and regional planning, and interpretations over spatial foundations, and in particular it emphasizes the application of spatial analysis tools to solve real-world planning problems using various software platforms, including ArcGIS, ERSI online portals, CommunityViz, Geoda, LanduseSim and CityEngine.

Prereq: 5001 and Grad standing, or permission of the instructor.

CRPLAN 6200 Graphic Visualization (4)

Justin Goodwin, Juliana Sarmento da Silveira

Fundamental skills in graphics and graphic technology commonly used in planning, including on-line, print, document, poster, and video layout and design.

CRPLAN 6420 Infrastructure Planning (3) [online]

Wayne Carlson

Infrastructure development plans address the planning, budgeting and programming challenges of making cities run.

CRPLAN 6950 Transportation Studio (6)

Chad Gibson

Columbus Recreation and Parks’ five year plan, in tandem with close partners of Central Ohio Greenways (COG), looks to build 17 trail projects within the established and flourishing Green Belts network. This studio would directly assess and facilitate six new 'community loops' based on the Greenways plan. Students will work directly with multiple jurisdictions and stakeholders to realize this expanded amenity. Outreach, fieldwork, presentations to the clients, public meetings and research will all be core components of this experience.

CRPLAN 6970 International Development Studio (6)

Kimberly Burton, Santina Contreras

For the International Development Studio in Spring Semester 2019, students will be working on various projects in Latin America/Caribbean, focusing on the country of Belize and potentially the territory of the U.S. Virgin Islands.  Projects will range across many areas of planning, including sustainability, resiliency, public engagement, environment, and community development.

Cross-listed with CRPLAN 4900S.

CRPLAN 7300 Planning Dissertations and Theses from Start to Finish (3)

Gulsah Akar

Covers the full dissertation/thesis process: topic selection, refinement, proposal development, literature review, methods, data collection/analysis, presenting and publishing, getting a job, life on the job.

Enrollment in this course is restricted to PhD students and Master?s students who have support of a potential advisor.

CRPLAN 7500 Resolving Social Conflict (3)

Mattijs Van Maasakkers

Multidisciplinary examination of social conflict, its dynamics and negotiated and consensual resolution; offers broad-based framework for diagnosing and managing conflict; applied to legal, environmental, organizational, and geopolitical conflicts.

CRPLAN 7509 Disasters: Preparedness and Response (3)

Santina Contreras

Introduction to planning, policy, and management issues that arise when disaster strikes, and the roles of government, non-profits, communities, and individuals in emergency preparedness by examining a variety of recent natural and human-made disasters, both in the U.S. and abroad.

Cross-listed in PubAfrs.

CRPLAN 7531 Economic Development Policy (3)

Edward Hill

Takes a practical approach to the legal, policy, and business issues related to urban redevelopment. Students gain a legal perspective as they investigate business and public policy issues surrounding redevelopment in our urban core.

Cross-listed in PubAfrs. 

Landscape Architecture Seminars

Spring 2019

 

LARCH 2780/7890 Landscape Architecture Topics Seminar | Site Itineraries: Walking and Drawing (3)

Katie Jenkins

This seminar will examine the relationship between walking and drawing—the ways in which each delineates territory, modifies land and leaves traces. We will undertake extensive hand drawing and walking exercises that generate novel methods of interpreting and shaping the landscape.

LARCH 2780/7890 Landscape Architecture Topics Seminar | Parametric Surfaces (3)

Troy Malmstrom

Within parametric design lies the ability to explore an infinite number of design solutions with any given set of variables.  So what happens when this design process meets the very surfaces we interact with on a daily basis?  This seminar seeks to break down and explore existing projects utilizing parametric design techniques gaining a further understanding of their constructs while also allowing students to implement similar methods within their own studio designs.

Utilizing the Grasshopper interface within Rhino 5.0, students will begin by replicating a series of contemporary case-study projects employing the parametric design software.  These projects range in scale from large topographies such as Eisenman?s Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe to facade studies such as Herzog & De Meuron?s Signal Box and more.  After understanding each case-study, students will then take the project further as they propose their own modification to the parametric definition resulting in an altered version of the original project.  The course will culminate in the fabrication of one these modified systems utilizing the school?s various prototyping and fabrication equipment.

Prerequisite:  Beginner/Intermediate knowledge of Rhino 5.0

LARCH 2780/7890 Landscape Architecture Topics Seminar (3)

Tameka Sims

What we wear is a layered motif of materials that have been colored, cut, and shaped, it is also an expression of identity which changes from day to day or even hour to hour depending on our mood, changes in environment and or occasion. Many urban landscapes are created out of necessity with little to no consideration for identity and potential use as immersive and dynamic spaces. This seminar will move beyond the world of standard, and convention, and will aim to create new topographic forms generated through experimentation and the iterative process practiced throughout the fashion industry. Working toward three main goals we will: 1)  use textiles as a medium for spontaneous experimentation, 2) document and detail generated forms for future replication, and 3) use storytelling as a means to document how one moves through a changing landscape over a given period of time.

LARCH 2780/7890 Landscape Architecture Topics Seminar (3) 

Karla Trott

From antiquity to contemporary times, site planning has been a means for the thoughtful arrangement of disparate elements and the careful shaping of the spaces left between them.  Site planning continues to be a significant type of project design for both architectures and landscape architectures. Site planning is driven by both poetic and functional intentions as well as ecological and cultural concerns.

This seminar will investigate, through case studies, competition comparisons, diagramming and design projects a range of site planning conceptual strategies and technical components.  We will investigate a range of site planning scales and program types with an eye to exploring any distinctions between the approaches to site planning found in architecture from that of landscape architecture, we will then consider how a more synthetic practice might be conceived.

Crosslisted with ARCH 5590.

LARCH 4410/7410 Advanced Landscape Technologies (3)

Ethan McGory

Students refine their ability to develop and represent planting design through analysis of precedent projects; exploring design development and iteration methods; visiting local gardens and nurseries; and designing and investigating plant communities and maintenance strategies.  The course will also include hands on activities related to the construction and maintenance of gardens.

LARCH 4410/7410 Advanced Landscape Technologies (3)

Halina Steiner

This course examines the relationship between people, water, and infrastructure west of the 100th meridian of the United States. This includes primarily arid, mediterranean, and desert climates. The 100th meridian, not only, marks a distinct  ecological shift in the United States, but also marks a change in how water rights are governed. The shift in water law has spatial consequences on the landscape, allowing water to move further distances to be used.

This includes: a review of historic relationships between people, water, and the development of new water infrastructures; the intended and actual outcomes of these water infrastructures; current issues facing water; and solutions for water conservation, via green infrastructure practices.

Architecture Seminars

Spring 2019

ARCH 5290 Topics in Architectural Theory | The City (3) 

Douglas Graf

The seminar will look at the history and structure of the city and the impact of various ideas on the organization, appearance, and functioning of the city.  Within a general framework, there will be a particular focus on a smaller group of cities which have had a significant impact on the structure of other cities, on the imagination, or are particularly interesting over long periods of time.

Topics will include:

The general history of cities

Significant types and exemplars

The specific histories of representative cities

Issues of geography and its relation to cities

Formal invention and it's impact on cities

Peripheral inventions and their consequences (the train, the automobile, water power, the elevator, the internet, etc.)

Unintended  consequences in general (war [Berlin, Coventry], developing industries [Detroit], declining industries [Detroit]

The economies of cities

The role of planning, it's successes and failures

The various forms of housing and their relationship to the structure of the city

The impact of transportation and other innovative technologies

The relationship of the city to architectural and landscape ideas, in general, and select specific buildings and landscapes particularly.

The history of environmental issues, and especially the challenges of climate change.

The image of the city and its significance in politics, the arts, and popular culture.

Readings will be assigned and discussed and a general critical framework will be developed.

There will be no paper or exam, but periodic presentations will be made by the seminar participants on particular issues or particular places to further our investigations and facilitate class discussion.

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ARCH 5290 Topics in Architectural Theory | The Architecture of Organization: Visualizing Archives, Inventories, Cycles, Switches and Other Ordering Operations (3)

Karen Lewis

This course will engage the history, politics, and aesthetics of organizing information in various material and immaterial forms. Using the representation skills of architecture, students will develop a series of visualizations that describe the architecture of several organizational systems that engage physical, temporal and social structures. Case studies, and corresponding site visits, will look to the physical organization of materials at the Albrecht Library of Rare Architecture Books, the Central Ohio Mail Processing Center, and the Designer Shoe Warehouse (DSW); timing structures of people, airplanes and weather via the Port Columbus International Airport; and the social and human systems that structure the Wexner Medical Center operations.  The case studies will explore the mechanisms and techniques that institutions engage for organizing physical (books, shoes, mail), temporal (travel schedules) and social (human) systems, and will seek ways to represent these material and immaterial systems through a series of rigorous drawings.

To synthesize this field work, students will make books, diagrams, books, maps, indexes, timelines, charts, and three-dimensional models that describe the structure and organization of these systems. By drawing the architecture of what shapes the archive, for example, we untangle questions about the politics and aesthetics of organization. Working between the immaterial and the dimensional, students will describe physical and intangible networks using the visual and technical vocabularies of their own disciplines.

OPEN to Architecture and Landscape Architecture students. Familiarity with Rhino, InDesign and Illustrator is required

ARCH 5290 Topics in Architectural Theory | Not Europe: Architecture in the Rest of the World: II (3)

Jane Murphy

Assuming a substantial grounding in the history of western architecture, this seminar will provide an opportunity to study the architecture of other places:  Asia, Africa, Latin America and indigenous cultures of North America. Both great monuments and everyday building will be part of the investigation.  The class will be organized roughly in thirds:

  1. Pre-15th Century: ancient civilizations and great monuments
  2. Colonialism: East/West influences
  3. Post-colonial and contemporary architecture outside of Europe and North America: the 21st century phenomenon of globalization and its localized interpretations in places such as Vietnam and China.

The first offering of the seminar topic was a broad overview. This course will allow a more targeted look at specific locations or topics.  Students who participated in the first offering of the seminar are welcome to join again.

ARCH 5290 Topics in Architectural Theory | THE CITY & THE CITY: DESIGNING FOR EMERGENCE AND A NEW TYPOLOGY FOR LIVING-TOGETHER-IN-THE-CITY (3)

Ann Pendleton-Julian

If cities build and inhabit the overlap of a Venn diagram of multiple influences: 

• material infrastructure and form; 

• socio-political, -economic and -cultural behaviors, norms and systems; 

• environmental resources, constraints and systems; 

• the desires, identities and cultural constructs we hold and adapt in constant response to these other things; 

• and the urban processes of their own emergence – top-down and bottom up . . .

and if we recognize that our cities are under stress — that all things disrupting contemporary life are changing all things inside that Venn diagram . . .

and if indeed “the city is like a great house and the house in its turn a small city” . . . 

then housing, which is a collective act of ‘house’, can be seen as both the canary in the coal mine and the Hopeful Monster* of a critical inflection point in our history of cities.

Approach: In philosophy, the sciences, art, and specifically within complexity theory, emergence refers to a very specific process; one in which simple interactions among individual parts or agents form complex behaviors and patterns at the systems level. From slime molds and coral colonies, to settlements, cities and social affordances like Twitter, “emergence is this sense of much coming from little.” (J Holland) Drawing from a deep reading of a series of semi-utopian ‘manifestos’, each representing a different degree of top-down to bottom-up (formal to informal, ‘hard’ to ‘soft’) affordances, we will see what happens when we intersect them with a real project in DC–a public-social-private partnership between a major developer and university, foundation and private sector partners–that is proposing a new programmatic model of living with, and for, diversity.

*hopeful monster is a term from biology that refers to a hypothetical individual organism that, by means of a fortuitous macromutation permitting an adaptive shift to a new mode of life, becomes the founder of a new type of organism and a vehicle of macroevolution. 

ARCH 5590 Topics in Building Technology | An Atlas of Novel Comforts (3)

Andrew Cruse

Human comfort is a vital yet understudied aspect of architecture’s environmental history. The dominant idea of comfort embedded in contemporary architecture holds that there is an ideal interior climate at which people are most productive and most content. Such a climate  remains constant across space and time, and does not vary with social or environmental differences. Global climate change is heightening our collective consciousness of comfort as it becomes increasingly difficult to separate such stable interior climates changing exterior ones. This seminar will examine the connections between different forms of comfort and different forms of architecture. It’s premise is that comfort, like climate, is not a stable index of energetic balance, but instead a condition of flux on which human activity has a direct impact. Buildings sit at the intersection of metabolism and meteorology, culture and climate. They are ideally poised to help understand and creatively respond to the environmental changes. Understanding the socio-technical role of comfort in architecture’s environmental history can disturb our certainties about interior and exterior climates, design and energy, the body and the environment. It removes us from our comfort zone, and allows us to get comfortable in the evolving climate around us.

ARCH 5590 Topics in Building Technology | SUPER-SIPs II: THERMO-FOAMING (3)

Justin Diles

This seminar will explore the rich potential of two uncommon architectural materials: fiber-reinforced plastic composites and a new type of recycled foam that can be shaped with heat. By creatively joining these materials with advanced digital fabrication strategies, students will design and prototype an innovative, self-supporting architectural enclosure system. Loosely centered on structural insulated panel (SIPs) technology, coursework will involve the analysis and transformation of historical and contemporary construction systems as well as direct, hands-on experimentation with plastic, foam, a strip-heater and the vacuum former. In addition to learning about the history of plastic materials in general and architectural plastics specifically, the class will visit a factory in Ohio that currently makes large and lightweight composite walls for the military. Student prototypes will be submitted to the 2019 Composites Challenge competition, organized by the American Composites Manufacturers Association. Successful entries may be included in an exhibition at the 2019 AIA convention. (Knowlton students took 2nd Prize in the most recent competition.) Materials needed to build prototypes for the seminar will be largely donated by local and national industry partners.

ARCH 5590 Topics in Building Technology (3)

Karla Trott

From antiquity to contemporary times, site planning has been a means for the thoughtful arrangement of disparate elements and the careful shaping of the spaces left between them.  Site planning continues to be a significant type of project design for both architectures and landscape architectures. Site planning is driven by both poetic and functional intentions as well as ecological and cultural concerns.

This seminar will investigate, through case studies, competition comparisons, diagramming and design projects a range of site planning conceptual strategies and technical components.  We will investigate a range of site planning scales and program types with an eye to exploring any distinctions between the approaches to site planning found in architecture from that of landscape architecture, we will then consider how a more synthetic practice might be conceived.

Crosslisted with LARCH 2780/7890

General Education and Introductory Courses

Below is a list of General Education (GE) and introductory courses that will be offered through the Knowlton School in upcoming terms. For a list of all of the GE courses offered through Knowlton, see our Complete list of GEs offered through the Knowlton School. For a list of foundation, prerequisite, and other introductory courses that may be helpful as you explore our majors, see our Undergraduate Admissions page.

Spring 2019

ARCH 2220 Sustainability and the Built Environment (3)

Aimee Moore

Introduction to sustainability and the built environment, emphasis on cultural context, including contributing geographic, political, social, and economic factors which influence the form of the constructed world. 

GE soc sci human, nat, and econ resources course.

ARCH 2300/LARCH 2300/E Outlines of the Built Environment (3)

Aimee Moore

Introduction to architecture, landscape architecture, and planning as cultural practices that shape the physical environment.

GE cultures and ideas course.

ARCH/LARCH 2310 Introduction to Design (4)

Dow Kimbrell, Halina Steiner, Benjamin Wilke

Introduction to the design of the physical environment through the exploration of form, space, and order using drawing and modeling techniques.

CRPLAN 2110 Creating Innovative Cities and Regions (3)

Don Leonard, Kareem Usher

This is the first class to take for students interested in the Bachelor of Science in City and Regional Planning. Make a direct impact on the City of Columbus this autumn. Meet the movers and shakers who make things happen in the city?s neighborhoods and leave your mark on Columbus! This course is designed to be a fun and engaging and only requires a willingness to make Columbus a better place. Be prepared to go on informative field trips where you will experience engaging and hands-on real-world projects in places like the Short North, Downtown, Franklinton and more! This class will help you become an innovator and begin your career as a thought-leader in planning field.

CRPLAN 3500 The Socially Just City (3)

Lauren Edwards

Too many cities are split between the haves and the have-nots. Explore how to reduce poverty, increase access to public services, and create a high quality of life for all residents.

GE soc sci orgs and polities and diversity soc div in the US course.

CRPLAN 4597 The Global Environment in Planning (3)

Don Leonard

A review of challenges in developed and developing countries, examining planning issues associated with economic development, social equity, growth and rural development.

GE cross-disciplinary seminar course.

LARCH 2367 Making and Meaning of the American Landscape (3)

Jacob Boswell

Overview and interpretation of influential figures, policies, programs, cultural forces, and environmental factors that have shaped the American landscape since the Revolutionary War. 

Prereq: English 1110 (111) or 110, or equiv. 

GE writing and comm: level 2 and cultures and ideas course.