News from the School

Mar 28

Knowlton School Lecturers Galo Canizares and Stephanie Sang Delgado (MARCH ’15) won the sixth annual Ragdale Ring competition for their design, Noodle Soup. Their proposal is a contemporary interpretation of the original Ragdale Ring garden theatre designed by architect Howard Van Doren Shaw in 1912. Canizares and Sang Delgado will receive a $15,000 production grant and a design-build residency at Ragdale, including studio space, room and board for up to 10 individuals for 18 days. Noodle Soup will open to the public with a special concert on Wednesday, June 13, 2018.

Mar 26

It’s called “the cliff.” It refers to the time when people with autism age out of services offered to those 18 and younger through the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Between now and 2026, some 400,000 younger Americans with autism will cross into adulthood. City and Regional Planning Professor of Practice Kyle Ezell led two undergraduate studios and a graduate workshop that explored ways that planners, architects and landscape architects can create communities where adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) can thrive beyond the cliff.

Mar 14

At this year’s 29th Annual Sphinx and Mortar Board Reception, Associate Professor of City and Regional Planning Jesus J. Lara was inducted as an Honorary Member of Mortar Board. Each year, the Mortar Board chapter at Ohio State provides an opportunity for a member of the society to recognize a faculty or staff member who has had a significant impact on their collegiate careers.

Mar 12

The Knowlton School announces the publication of the twelfth title in its Source Books in Architecture Series, Neil M. Denari / NMDA: The Baumer Lectures. Source Books in Architecture is a product of the Herbert Baumer seminars, a series of interactions between students and seminal practitioners at the Knowlton School at The Ohio State University. Neil M. Denari was the Autumn Semester 2015 Herbert Baumer Distinguished Visiting Professor.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CfN6e4ZRu7s
Mar 9

It sustains organic life and supports the built environment. Beneath grass and pavement, dirt abides, integral to life but largely taken for granted, according to Associate Professor of Landscape Architecture Paula Meijerink, whose exhibit, COLUMBUS DIRT: Illuminating the Invisible, is on display in the Knowlton School’s Banvard Gallery from March 7 through March 30. “We want someone who visits the exhibit to have a new appreciation of soil,” Meijerink explains. “The various components of the exhibit are essentially about soil research, proposition and implementation. The idea is to demonstrate the richness and diversity of soil on one hand, and also explore the question central to this exhibit: 'How can soil be experienced and initiate new ecologies?'”

Mar 1

The Square and Pavilion are the latest additions to the Novartis Campus in Basel, Switzerland. Designed by Good Form Studio—jointly led by Assistant Professor of Architecture Andrew Cruse and Professor of Landscape Architecture and Section Head Dorothée Imbert—the project seamlessly merges architectural and landscape interventions to create a new type of workspace for Novartis employees. The campus masterplan, devised by Italian architect Vittorio Magnago Lampugnani, has transformed a site of pharmaceutical production into a hub for research, and in doing so has created a showcase of contemporary architecture and landscape.

Feb 21

The 7th Annual Fashion Schau topped last year’s gate by raising $2,400 for Dress for Success Columbus, a non-profit organization that empowers women to achieve economic independence by providing a network of support, professional attire and career development tools. Kelsey Swarthout, Rachel Ghindea and Sarah Cronin, all seniors majoring in architecture, received the Golden T-Square, the Fashion Schau’s top honor. The two dresses, modeled by Swarthout and Ghindea, also won the People’s Choice award. Their garments played off the Schau’s theme by using materials from their structure’s class final assignment: destroyed bridges.

Feb 15

Six Knowlton School students are this year’s recipients of Architecture Research and Travel Awards (ARTA) which support independent research during summer 2018. This year’s awardees are: Tyler Cloud (MLA), Embedded Landscape Histories; Alexandra Oetzel (BSARCH), Wo[man] in the Landscape; Andrew Polefrone (MLA), URBAN AGRICULTURE AS CRISIS RESPONSE: A Comparative Study of Cuba and Colombia; Brittany L. Schroeder (MLA), The Forest Plantations: Characterizing the Plantings of the Civilian Conservation Corps in the Eastern United States; Lucia Aguiar (MLA) and Rachel Smith (MLA): Living Land in New Zealand: Legal Personhood in the Context of Cultural Landscapes.

Feb 5

The Knowlton School welcomes Santina Contreras as an assistant professor in the City and Regional Planning Section. Her research and teaching focus on the intersection of natural hazards, urban planning and international development. In her work, she explores how participatory processes unfold in complex settings, such as areas exposed to environmental hazards and in developing countries. She has extensive experience in the private and nonprofit sectors working on the design and implementation of housing and post-disaster projects. This has included engaging with diverse communities vulnerable to natural hazards in Mexico, Haiti and Indonesia.

Jan 26

In Reyner Banham and the Paradoxes of High Tech, Architecture Section Head and Professor Todd Gannon reassesses one of the most influential voices in twentieth-century architectural history through a detailed examination of Banham’s writing on High Tech architecture and its immediate antecedents. Gannon devotes significant attention to Banham’s late work, including archival materials related to the manuscript Banham left unfinished at his death in 1988. Gannon’s book also includes Banham’s previously unpublished draft introduction to Making Architecture.

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