News from the School

Aug 12

The Landscape Architecture Section announces Jason Siebenmorgen as the 2019 Trott Distinguished Visiting Professor at the Knowlton School. Throughout the autumn semester, Siebenmorgen will conduct workshops and field research with landscape architecture students as part of the Glimcher Seminar.

Aug 8

The Knowlton School welcomes incoming faculty for the 2019-20 academic year: Professor of Architecture Benjamin Flowers, and Assistant Professors of Landscape Architecture John Dean Davis and Michelle Arevalos Franco.

Aug 6

Ryue Nishizawa | SANAA: Grace Farms, edited by Knowlton School Senior Lecturer Ben Wilke (MARCH '03, MAS ’11), is the latest addition to the Knowlton School’s Source Books in Architecture series. Nishizawa was the 2016-17 Herbert Baumer Distinguished Visiting Professor at the Knowlton School at The Ohio State University.

Jul 31

We spoke with Angela Beer, who manages the Knowlton School’s Student Services office, about student career planning and opportunities for alumni engagement.

Jul 22

The Knowlton School is pleased to announce Professor Jennifer Clark as the next Section Head of City and Regional Planning at the Knowlton School. 

Jul 12

The Legacy House Project is the vision of Curtis J. Moody, FAIA, NOMA, NCARB, LEED AP (BSARCH ’73), Founder and CEO of Moody Nolan. “We had the desire to see something more tangible in our charitable giving,” stated Moody. “We determined that we are architects—and what we do is design—so why don’t we do something that is within our wheelhouse?”

Jul 8

Acting on Mayor Andrew Ginther’s vision for affordable and sustainable housing in Columbus, Franklin County and Columbus leaders created the Central Ohio Community Land Trust. Supporting this effort were city and regional planning students in the Neighborhood Planning Studio, co-instructed by Associate Professor Bernadette Hanlon and Assistant Professor Jason Reece. These students were tasked by Columbus City Council to research and present proposals for implementing a Community Land Trust (CLT) in the City of Columbus/Franklin County.

Jul 1

Inside Knowlton Hall, critics and students were invited to don a headset and enter another Knowlton Hall—this one a virtual space complete with identical walls, floors, ceilings and windows, but simulating an architecture unbound by the laws of physics. This virtual reality (VR) experience, where visitors moved through the space and interacted as avatars, was the culmination of graduate architecture student John Fleming’s Master Project. “I wanted to explore the ways in which architecture can exercise agency in a virtual world that are impossible in physical reality. When we view VR only as a representational tool, we accept the rules and limitations of physical reality,” commented Fleming. “My project asks what is possible when architecture is designed for a virtual world.”

May 3

Whether using drone flights to create high resolution, geo-referenced maps that are viewable as interactive 3D space or assisting students in virtual reality applications for a digitally built environment, Chris Strasbaugh endeavors to expand the Knowlton School’s capacity to experiment with innovative technologies that impact the planning and design fields. This commitment was recognized at the College of Engineering’s annual Above and Beyond Staff Awards program. This year, the Knowlton School’s Digital Resource Archivist and Curator received an award for Exemplary Support or Advancement of Research for his superior support of research activities.

Apr 12

Assistant Professor of City and Regional Planning Zhenhua Chen has published High Speed Rail and China’s New Economic Geography: Impact Assessment from the Regional Science Perspective, along with co-author, Kingsley E. Haynes at George Mason University. The book is part of Edward Elgar Publishing’s New Horizons in Regional Science series. High Speed Rail and China’s New Economic Geography presents an analytical approach to assessing the socioeconomic impact of high speed rail in China, with an emphasis on capturing the spatial spillover effects of rail infrastructure development on China’s economic geography in terms of land use, housing market, tourism, regional disparity, modal competition, the economy and environment.

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