Courses

To view each program's curriculum, full course catalog, as well as General Education (GE) courses and minors offered through the school, click the links below. The table below includes a list of electives that will be offered by each section and a list of GE and introductory courses offered through the school for the autumn 2018 semester. To see the full list of courses and their details for a particular term, visit the schedule of classes on BuckeyeLink.

PROGRAM CURRICULA

Architecture

Graduate | Undergraduate | Undergraduate Minor in Architecture | Section Course Catalog

Landscape Architecture

Graduate | Undergraduate | Undergraduate Minor in Landscape Architecture | Section Course Catalog

City and Regional Planning

Doctorate | Master's | Undergraduate | Minors in City and Regional Planning | Section Course Catalog

City and Regional Planning Electives

Autumn 2018

CRPLAN 2700 Technology in Design (1) [session 2]

Charles Cartwright

This workshop is designed to introduce 3D modeling as a tool for communicating planning topics such as visualizing zoning, urban density, and future project conceptualization.  Trimble Sketchup, a free 3D modeling program, will be used as an armature to create visualizations during the course. 

CRPLAN 3400 Planning for Sustainable Economic Development (3)

Tobias Rittner

Understand the intersection of economics, the environment, and development in order to use planning tools to promote sustainable economic development. Prereq: Econ 2001.01, 2001.02 (200), 2001.03H, or AEDEcon 2001.

CRPLAN 3500 The Socially Just City (3)

Lauren Edwards

Too many cities are split between the haves and the have-nots. Explore how to reduce poverty, increase access to public services, and create a high quality of life for all residents.

CRPLAN 3510 Murder by Design (3)

Jason Reece

The way cities are designed influences criminal activity. Crime mapping, siting of businesses, and neighborhood design are explored to create safescapes. Prereq. Jr standing

CRPLAN 3620 The Underground City (3)

Kimberly Burton

If the surface of the Earth became uninhabitable, people could be forced to live underground to survive. A plan will be conceived and developed in order to perpetuate the human race. Prereq: 3000

CRPLAN 4200 Arts and Entertainment Planning (3)

Shoshanah Goldberg-Miller

Planning for arts and entertainment districts, from the neighborhood art studio to entire cities as entertainment destinations.

CRPLAN 4597 The Global Environment in Planning (3)

Don Leonard

A review of challenges in developed and developing countries, examining planning issues associated with economic development, social equity, growth and rural development.

CRPLAN 4910S Realizing the Plan: Neighborhood Planning Studio (6)

Instructor TBD

The Neighborhood Planning Studio provides an opportunity for students to experience the unique environment of supporting community development and equitable community revitalization through neighborhood planning. Working in collaboration with the Neighborhood Design Center and other community stakeholders, the studio will assist in the development of the next Hilltop neighborhood plan for the City of Columbus. The plan will guide revitalization efforts in the Hilltop community. Hilltop is a historic community on the West Site which includes more than 70,000 residents. The area is economically and racially diverse, contains many assets, but has struggled in recent decades due to job losses and the housing crisis. Planning efforts will seek to improve the physical, social/human and economic environment and will be grounded in robust community engagement.

Planning for marginalized neighborhoods includes efforts to improve the physical, social/human and economic environment and is grounded in robust community engagement.  The course utilizes various best practices in community development, but is focused on two primary community development models, Asset Based Community Development (http://www.abcdinstitute.org/) and Trauma Informed Community Development (http://www.aecf.org/blog/a-model-move-trauma-informed-community-building/).

CRPLAN 4910S Realizing the Plan: Reinventing the Suburban Shopping Mall and Breathing New Life into “Legacy” Office Parks

Chad Gibson

Studio Clients: City of Dublin, Ohio Development Department, and partnerships with the neighboring Cities of Columbus and Hilliard

Primary Client Contact: Rachel Ray, AICP, Economic Development Administrator, City of Dublin, Ohio

Course Objectives:

  • Learn how to identify and plan for threats to community well-being
  • Learn how to engage in a multi-jurisdictional planning process
  • Learn fundamental planning & economic development principles – stakeholder engagement through business retention & expansion (BR&E) meetings, strategic planning
  • Learn how to plan in spite of the complexities of redevelopment – absentee/disengaged land owners, land assembly challenges, lease factors (non-competes, etc.), “legacy” easements and deed restrictions, etc. 
  • Learn about future trends in commercial real estate: office, retail, entertainment, mobility, parking, etc.

Expected Deliverables:

  • Create a redevelopment plan for the reinvention of the Mall at Tuttle Crossing shopping center
  • Create a strategic plan for the Tuttle Crossing Boulevard commercial office corridor, addressing land use, economic development programs, and redevelopment considerations, in addition to short- and long-term implementation strategies

CRPLAN 4910S Realizing the Plan: German Village 2050 Plan Studio (6)

Roxyanne Burrus

Up to one million new residents will be added to the Columbus region by 2050. How will German Village meet the challenges of this more crowded future? In this planning process, you will recognize trends and forecasts that will help position the German Village Society to be proactive and engaged with future urban development rather than reactionary and defensive to potential cultural, social, economic, or built environment influences. You will strive to think beyond the timeline of contemporary programming and current strategic planning to identify future impacts on the neighborhood and develop a lens to understand and consider German Village Society’s reception to these influences. You will build upon and continue the long history of neighborhood preservation, community engagement, and strategic guidance that has defined German Village to continue as a nationally recognized historic neighborhood. You will seek to achieve The Village's desire to utilize momentum and experience to propel the German Village neighborhood into the future in which a newfound interest in urban neighborhoods and exciting potentials. You will figure ways of bringing together residents of German Village, Columbus, and the outside world both physically, socially, and culturally to enrich the quality of life of residents and visitors alike. You will inspire creative solutions to methods of movement, connection, and interaction to ensure that ease of access is maintained for all members of German Village and the greater Columbus community.

https://germanvillage.com/about/history/

http://getinsight2050.org/

http://www.morpc.org/pdf/ULI_Columbus2050.pd

CRPLAN 5001 Introduction to GIS (4)

Zhenhua Chen, Eblal Zakzok

Introduction to the basic principles of geographic information systems and their use in spatial analysis and information management. Prereq: Sr or Grad standing.

CRPLAN 5010 Historic Preservation Planning (3) [session 1]

Nancy Recchie

Cities are rich in history. Policies, incentives and planning aid in preserving unique historic character and heritage of cities. Prereq: Sr or Grad standing.

CRPLAN 5100 (1) [session 1]

Charles Cartwright

This class teaches CAD.

CRPLAN 5160 Green Building Methods for Planning (1)

Kimberly Burton

This course focuses on green building methods, techniques and practices and how they can be applied to city planning practice. Particular attention is paid to LEED-certification, a program that recognizes building practices that save money, reduce water consumption, make better material choices, have higher property values, and overall have fewer negative impacts on the environment.

CRPLAN 5200 Metropolitan and Regional Planning (3)

Kyle Ezell

Cities and towns are becoming increasingly dependent on each other. Progressive approaches to regional planning directly influence the economy and quality of life. Prereq: Sr or Grad standing.

CRPLAN 5320 Transportation Data Analytics for Urban Planners (3)

Amber Woodburn

This course will provide students with the fundamental knowledge to collect and analyze data for the purpose of planning transportation infrastructure. Students will have the opportunity to build expertise in innovative transportation data collection, improve familiarity with publicly available transportation data sources, develop basic coding skills to process and visualize transportation data, and consider careers as transportation planning analysts. Practical skill development includes essay writing, R coding, graphics communication, UAV (drone) operations training, and professional networking. This introductory course is limited to undergraduate upperclassman and graduate students. Students are not required to have prior coding experience.

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CRPLAN 5700 Urban Transportation Demand Forecasting (3)

Gulsah Akar, Rabi Mishalani

Introduction and applications for quantitative demand forecasting in urban transportation. Prereq: Math 1118 or equiv, or Grad standing.

CRPLAN 5880 Interdepartmental Seminar: Creative Practice (3)

Michael Cadwell

The essential feature of adventure is that it is a going forward Into unknown territory.

The joy of adventure is unaccountable.

This is the attractiveness of art work.  It is adventurous, strenuous and joyful.

-Agnes Martin

This seminar will explore how to sustain creative activity.   What is assumed elsewhere in a student’s education – creative practice – will be investigated in this seminar.  Aspects of creativity will include beginning and continuing, mentors and models, discipline and technique, solo and social, history and talent, intelligence and sensibility, loss and resilience.  To address these issues, there will be short readings from disciplines within the Knowlton School as well as those outside.  Authors will include the musician Patti Smith, the mythologist Joseph Campbell, the novelist Toni Morrison, the critic Dave Hickey, the artist Cindy Sherman, the dancer Bill T. Jones, and the psychologist Howard Gardner. 

The seminar is open to students regardless of discipline or standing.  There are no prerequisites other than a willingness to engage readings, contribute to discussions, and complete writing assignments.

Note: Cross-listed with LARCH 2780/7890 and ARCH 5290

CRPLAN 5880 Interdepartmental Seminar: Columbus Housing Dialogue (1)

Rachel Kleit

This seminar involves students in the once a month meeting of the Columbus Housing Dialogue, a group discussion between academics, students, and housing practitioners on local housing issues. Coordinated by Professor of City and Regional Planning Rachel Kleit and Columbus Housing Administrator Rita Parise, the dialogue meets monthly to learn and discuss topics of interest.  

The Housing Dialogue meets the last Tuesday of the month, August, September, October, November, January, February, March, and April 8:30am-10am. The location is off campus, at the offices of the Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission (MORPC), 111 Liberty Street, Columbus OH.  Parking is free (park in the M spaces).

CRPLAN 5890 Integrated Planning Workshop (ULI prep class) (2) [session 2]

Aaron Domini

The Integrated Planning Workshop focuses on the how to create specific development/redevelopment plans within urban areas. The workshop is built around the integration of planning, landscape architecture, and architecture disciplines in the design process, including each step in the master planning decision making process.  Students will review of development types and capacities, learn how to identify target uses for a site based on market considerations, create of sketch plans both (hand and graphic), and practice specific urban design techniques. Students will also get practice in quickly and effectively graphically illustrating and communicating planning/design concepts to a variety of audiences (public and private). This class will also serve as the preparatory class for those students who have an interested in competing in the ULI Heinz Competition in January or the HUD Urban Design Competition in the spring semester. Grad only.

CRPLAN 6010 Innovation in City and Regional Planning (3)

Kyle Ezell

Every year this course focuses on an innovative topic in the planning practice. For Autumn 2018, the topic is planning and design for autism. People with autism should be able to thrive in the built environment. This workshop will focus on urban design, site planning, and calculating the financial commitment of implementing autism planning and design standards in the built environment. Using planning and design tools such as Rhinoceros, you will learn how to build out an autism-standards real estate development site plan from a design guidelines toolkit, finesse urban design computer programs, and how to estimate costs of development in a pro-forma. Design skills are NOT required. All graduate students who want to learn urban design tools and skills are welcome to enroll.

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CRPLAN 6310 Law and Planning II: Environment and Society (3)

Robert Oast

The role of social and environmental justice and other societal considerations in the establishment of a legal framework in planning. Prereq. 6300

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CRPLAN 6350 The Socially Just City (3)

Kareem Usher

Poverty reduction, access to public services and improving quality of life are goals to achieving the socially just city.

CRPLAN 6425 Measuring Resilience to Disasters for Planning (3)

Zhenhua Chen

This course focuses on concepts, elements, theory, and applications for resilience to disasters in urban and regional planning. Students will develop quantitative analytical skills in resilience assessment through various methods, including resilience indicators, cost-benefit analysis, econometric analysis, and simulation analysis.

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CRPLAN 6430 Urban Design (3)

Jesus Lara

Vibrant cities contribute to quality of life, through urban design and urban form.  Site analysis, context sensitive design and impacts of design choices are explored.

CRPLAN 6610 Grant Writing in the Public Sector (3)

Gretchen Hammond

Public officials rely on grants to help fund their grand plans. Planners find grants, prepare proposals, and manage grants to effectively support public projects.

CRPLAN 6700 Technology in Design (1) [session 2]

Charles Cartwright

This workshop is designed to introduce 3D modeling as a tool for communicating planning topics such as visualizing zoning, urban density, and future project conceptualization. Trimble Sketchup, a free 3D modeling program, will be used as an armature to create visualizations during the course.

CRPLAN 6930 Neighborhood Planning Studio (6)

Jason Reece

The Neighborhood Planning Studio provides an opportunity for students to experience the unique environment of supporting community development and equitable community revitalization through neighborhood planning. Working in collaboration with the Neighborhood Design Center and other community stakeholders, the studio will assist in the development of the next Hilltop neighborhood plan for the City of Columbus. The plan will guide revitalization efforts in the Hilltop community. Hilltop is a historic community on the West Site which includes more than 70,000 residents. The area is economically and racially diverse, contains many assets, but has struggled in recent decades due to job losses and the housing crisis. Planning efforts will seek to improve the physical, social/human and economic environment and will be grounded in robust community engagement.

Planning for marginalized neighborhoods includes efforts to improve the physical, social/human and economic environment and is grounded in robust community engagement.  The course utilizes various best practices in community development, but is focused on two primary community development models, Asset Based Community Development (http://www.abcdinstitute.org/) and Trauma Informed Community Development (http://www.aecf.org/blog/a-model-move-trauma-informed-community-building/).

Note: Crosslisted with CRPLAN 4910S

CRPLAN 6960 Sustainability Studio (6)

Kim Burton

For the Sustainability Studio, students will prepare a Hazard Mitigation Plan for Guernsey County, Ohio.  The clients will be the Ohio and Guernsey County Emergency Management Agencies with review and approval by FEMA.  The Hazard Mitigation Plan will analyze and map potential natural and man-made hazards, such as flooding and cyber-security attacks, and develop actions that the County can implement to address these issues.  Students will interact with local communities and county, state, and federal agencies on this plan.

Landscape Architecture Seminars

Autumn 2018

LARCH 2780/7890 Landscape Architecture Topics Seminar: Creative Practice (3) 

Michael Cadwell

The essential feature of adventure is that it is a going forward Into unknown territory.

The joy of adventure is unaccountable.

This is the attractiveness of art work.  It is adventurous, strenuous and joyful.

-Agnes Martin

This seminar will explore how to sustain creative activity.   What is assumed elsewhere in a student’s education – creative practice – will be investigated in this seminar.  Aspects of creativity will include beginning and continuing, mentors and models, discipline and technique, solo and social, history and talent, intelligence and sensibility, loss and resilience.  To address these issues, there will be short readings from disciplines within the Knowlton School as well as those outside.  Authors will include the musician Patti Smith, the mythologist Joseph Campbell, the novelist Toni Morrison, the critic Dave Hickey, the artist Cindy Sherman, the dancer Bill T. Jones, and the psychologist Howard Gardner.  The seminar is open to students regardless of discipline or standing.  There are no prerequisites other than a willingness to engage readings, contribute to discussions, and complete writing assignments.

Note: Cross-listed with CRPLAN 5880 and ARCH 5290

LARCH 2780/7890 Landscape Architecture Topics Seminar: Glimcher Seminar (3)

Katie Jenkins

Mikyoung Kim will be this autumn’s Glimcher Distinguished Visiting Professor. The seminar will be structured around Mikyoung Kim’s three visits to the Knowlton School and incorporate workshops and discussions on process and fabrication. The course embraces Kim's diverse interests in design, sculpture, and environmental art to focus on material investigation, casting, and hybrid drawing and modeling techniques. The course will culminate in a public exhibition in Knowlton’s Banvard Gallery. (Note: Instructor Permission Required)

LARCH 2780/7890 Landscape Architecture Topics Seminar (3)

Troy Malmstrom

As designers we constantly struggle with the challenge of expressing our design intents second‐hand through various forms of representation such as drawings, renderings, models, etc. A similar struggle exists between the digital and the physical worlds as designers move further into the fabrication realm using equipment such as CNC routers, plasma cutters, and robotic arms for building their ideas. 

This seminar will explore the use of these digital tools available within the Knowlton Schools as well as material investigations as a means by which to represent an idea. We will experiment with craft and the process by which an object is made. Students will exploit opportunities that exist when a particular material as it is paired with a specific fabrication process, resulting in a whole new realm of prospects. We will utilize the prototyped model and fabricated object for these studies. Within this course students will have the opportunity to utilize 1) input devices such as digitizing arms and 3d scanners, 2) prototyping equipment such as laser cutters, 3d printers and vacuum formers, and 3) fabrication equipment like CNC routers and hot wire cutters while understanding the implications of the processes upon the resultant object.

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LARCH 4410/7410 Advanced Landscape Technologies: LANDMACHINE (3)

Jake Boswell

The dualism of nature and culture is no longer an operative model for how we conceive of the world. Rather, we live in a hybrid space, an ecological cyborg where the very air we breathe, the water we drink and the environments we inhabit are conditioned by mutually dependent physical, biological, and anthropogenic phenomena. We call this place/time lots of things, the Anthropocene, the cyborg-city, post-nature, but in all senses it’s populated by a new genre of “things,” objects that move between normative categories, being neither wholly mechanical nor biological; not plant, animal or machine: Cyborgs, LandMachines. This is the as yet inchoate world we now assume as designers and which sociologists, philosophers, landscape architects and architects have begun the work of theorizing.

In this class we will engage with and attempt to ground this theory through the development of a working heuristic for the LandMachine -- an instrument that will allow those engaged with them on both an intellectual and material level to see developmental trajectories, understand gaps, and reveal dead ends. To do this, reading and discussion around the concept of the LandMachine will take form in the creation of a definitional taxonomy that traces LandMachine types and their development while distinguishing discreet morphologies.    

But, like its subject, this course is a hybrid. Because any taxonomy of such a subject must express time and phenomena as well as form, we will use the exploration of types as a chance to develop skill in basic animation software – moving beyond the system diagram as an expression of time to create working, temporal, models for keystone species.

Instruction will be reading and discussion based, with periods devoted to tutorials and animation workshops. Basic familiarity with Rhino, Photoshop and Illustrator is expected.              

LARCH 4410/7410 Advanced Landscape Technologies (3)

Paula Meijerink

Introduction: When the planet Krypton exploded, the city Kandor survived as a bottle city. Superman-Red and Superman-Blue managed to restore Kandor to normal and recreate the planet Krypton. This planet however was barren: the landscape, the cities and life forms were destroyed. In order to remediate the planet, Superman-Red leads a team of scientists—at super speed—to plant seedlings from Kandor’s botanical gardens. Under the yellow sun, the Kryptonian seedlings grew to maturity in mere moments, thus recreating Krypton’s famous Scarlet Jungle.

This seminar explores, through imaginative projection and making, the introduction of nature (plants/biomass/organic life forms) into hostile human-altered environments. While exploring the threshold between imagination and reality, students will be planting a “jungle” on Waterman followed by developing planting details for an idealized jungle.

Objectives: To further develop knowledge of landscape strategies and technologies of introducing organic life in compromised human altered conditions; To engage in critical and creative reflection through making

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LARCH 5630/7600S Advanced Topics in History/Theory: Meat Matters: The Landscape of Animal Agriculture in America (3)

Forbes Lipschitz

Though Americans consume on average 200 pounds of meat each year, few stop to ponder the ways in which animals are bred, raised, and slaughtered. Largely hidden from public view, the global livestock sector is arguably the most ecologically influential industry in the world. it directly and indirectly impacts the world’s land and water resources, eroding biodiversity and contributing measurably to climate change. This critical inquiry seminar explores the history of livestock and poultry production in the United States from colonization to present day. Lectures and discussions address the evolution of conventional and alternative paradigms of meat, dairy and fiber production. Students will examine the typological spaces of animal agriculture, from field to slaughterhouse. Through archival research, site visits, and selected readings, students will craft an atlas that graphically examines the industry's impact on ecosystems, infrastructure and urban development across time.

Architecture Seminars

Autumn 2018

ARCH 5290 Topics in Architectural Theory (3) 

Michael Cadwell

The essential feature of adventure is that it is a going forward Into unknown territory.

The joy of adventure is unaccountable.

This is the attractiveness of art work.  It is adventurous, strenuous and joyful.

-Agnes Martin

This seminar will explore how to sustain creative activity.   What is assumed elsewhere in a student’s education – creative practice – will be investigated in this seminar.  Aspects of creativity will include beginning and continuing, mentors and models, discipline and technique, solo and social, history and talent, intelligence and sensibility, loss and resilience.  To address these issues, there will be short readings from disciplines within the Knowlton School as well as those outside.  Authors will include the musician Patti Smith, the mythologist Joseph Campbell, the novelist Toni Morrison, the critic Dave Hickey, the artist Cindy Sherman, the dancer Bill T. Jones, and the psychologist Howard Gardner.  The seminar is open to students regardless of discipline or standing.  There are no prerequisites other than a willingness to engage readings, contribute to discussions, and complete writing assignments.

Note: Cross-listed with CRPLAN 5880 and LARCH 2780/7890

ARCH 5590 Topics in Building Technology: Color & Light in Architecture (3)

Kay Bea Jones

You may have noticed that things around Knowlton have been changing! Notably over the past year, the presence of color experiments in the public realm have emerged, recessing concrete walls and structure, unadorned sheetrock,  and charcoal carpets to the background

Color & Light are two of the most impactful materials in architecture and design, yet they are often considered ephemeral qualities that eschew theory and practical research inquiry. This workshop format seminar will begin with theories of color pigment (Newton, Geothe, Itten, Wittgenstein, Munsell, Albers, Rothko, the Impressionists, the Fauvists) and investigate influences of quality and temperature of light to establish a basis for optical principles and applied practices.

Several new publications will provide a conceptual and critical frame for our inquiry. The majority of the term will be devoted to experimentation and discovery, involving varying media and subjective evaluation, and aiming to heighten sensitivity to the aesthetics of color and light in space and 3-dimensional form. We will read and discuss concerning the current state of chromatic affairs. Joseph Albers “Interactions of Color” method will foster initial lessons of perception and comprehension while providing a vocabulary for color composition.

Applying lessons from color theory will invite students to exercise reckless abandon, take risks, interpret outcomes together, and possibly experience joy beyond homogeneous rational principles or good taste. In doing so, we may also discover emotional impacts of color and deepen knowledge of one’s own vision and will.

ARCH 5590 Topics in Building Technology: Architecture | Video Games | Culture (3)

Stephen Turk

There is no doubt that video games are a major force in early 21st century popular culture. Less well known are the ramifications of debates within architecture that resonate with such gaming concepts as character, platform, level, scenario, and world building; particularly with regard to what might be seen as the emergence of Post Modern and Post Humanist theories of the nature of architecture. Cultural artifacts such as video games do not emerge out of a vacuum as the technologies upon which they are based are intertwined with developments occurring in other fields of human knowledge. An example of this interconnection between games and architecture is the way that systems of representation first developed and theorized within the context of architecture and engineering have been adopted by the makers of video game technology. Simply put, videogames have not developed outside of the larger forces of history that have simultaneously affected architectural, geographic, engineering, cinematic and art history.

The influences between technologies and disciplinary practices flow both directions; as can be seen in the way that architecture responded to the development of cinema in the early 20th century by adopting montage techniques and cinema-like movement narratives (Corbusier’s promenade architecturale) as organizational, programmatic, and formal strategies of composition. There are corresponding analogical cross-contaminations between contemporary game technology and architecture that have their closest parallel in the influence of cinema technology on Modern Architecture. This seminar is designed to look at these cultural and disciplinary overlaps and to explore their ramifications for the future of architectural discourse. The course will be structured as part lecture/ seminar and part practical workshop where actual technologies of representation are explored and examined to understand their deeper cultural implications. 

Additional Descriptions TBA

General Education and Introductory Courses

Below is a list of General Education (GE) and introductory courses that will be offered through the Knowlton School in upcoming terms. For a list of all of the GE courses offered through Knowlton, see our Complete list of GEs offered through the Knowlton School. For a list of foundation, prerequisite, and other introductory courses that may be helpful as you explore our majors, see our Undergraduate Admissions page.

Autumn 2018

ARCH 2300/LARCH 2300/E Outlines of the Built Environment (3)

Aimee Moore

Introduction to architecture, landscape architecture, and planning as cultural practices that shape the physical environment. 
GE cultures and ideas course

ARCH/LARCH 2310 Introduction to Design (4)

Instructors TBA

Introduction to the design of the physical environment through the exploration of form, space, and order using drawing and modeling techniques.

CRPLAN 2110 Creating Innovative Cities and Regions (3)

Santina Contreras

This is the first class to take for students interested in the Bachelor of Science in City and Regional Planning. Make a direct impact on the City of Columbus this autumn. Meet the movers and shakers who make things happen in the city?s neighborhoods and leave your mark on Columbus! This course is designed to be a fun and engaging and only requires a willingness to make Columbus a better place. Be prepared to go on informative field trips where you will experience engaging and hands-on real-world projects in places like the Short North, Downtown, Franklinton and more! This class will help you become an innovator and begin your career as a thought-leader in planning field.

CRPLAN 3500 The Socially Just City (3)

Lauren Edwards

Too many cities are split between the haves and the have-nots. Explore how to reduce poverty, increase access to public services, and create a high quality of life for all residents.

GE soc sci orgs and polities and diversity soc div in the US course

CRPLAN 4597 The Global Environment in Planning (3)

Don Leonard

A review of challenges in developed and developing countries, examining planning issues associated with economic development, social equity, growth and rural development.

GE cross-disciplinary seminar course

LARCH 2600 Outlines of Landscape Architecture: Visual Literacy in the Built Environment (3)

Justin Parscher

Overview of patterns and processes of human design on land in relation to environmental, economic, and socio-cultural forces, with an emphasis on interpretation of visual landscape change. 
GE VPA course